Peru Overall

Peru is the backpackers dream. Cheap, yet offering various activities. We found adventure sports, relaxing beaches, historical places, modern cities, weird sites, rich culture, friendly people, savory food, and so much more. There is an option for everybody.

Having extensively explored ruins in Ecuador before arriving in Peru, the historical sites had less amazement power, but the temple of the sun and the moon in Trujillo still captivated me. Even though the temple was buried and forgotten under the desert sand, after archeologists got their hands on the ruins, they did a beautiful job exposing the history of the layers of the walls. Another history rich place is Machu Picchu. A-no-joke, intense work from ancient times. I wouldn’t want to have lived in those times, building that world wonder on top of a mountain. Too much sweat excretion. No way Jose.

 Machu Picchu from a less famous angle

Machu Picchu from a less famous angle

Some of the other no-way experiences, but for different reasons, include the stray dogs and the insanitary meat markets (no, they aren’t selling stray dog meat). In so many places in Peru they had stray dogs lurking around. Pooping everywhere. Making the streets unsafe for the daydreamers. Luckily the bombs weren’t as smelly as some of the meat markets. The meat would be exposed all day on top of a regular table, no refrigeration, no cover, no shield from the sun sometimes. Walking by, we would be greeted with this awful stench of raw meat. Vomit-worthy. A least favorite experience for me. But don’t worry, I never got food poisoning. Peruvians still know how to cook yummy meals. I loved devouring my dishes at a low price.

Besides eating, I loved the sand dunes. Zooming around in the sand buggy, imagining myself in the movie Mad-Max. Sadly I didn’t have any silver spray paint, and worse, no mouth guard to shield me from the sand trying to be inhaled by me. I ended up taking enough sand home from sandboarding down the desert hills.

 Our sand buggy

Our sand buggy

Lima doesn’t have many hills, but this city has many things to offer. I relished sightseeing in the capital. If the absurd traffic could simmer down a bit, I’m certain I would enjoy living in this activity-balanced place. There are tons of parks here, big and small. Just as the rest of the country. Even the smallest town seems to have at least the center park and then some others spread sporadically. I feel that there are so many sit-down-on-a-bench-and-relax parks, that the people don’t even have the ability to use them all. Creating lovely scenery while we got lost. Luckily the internet connection was surprisingly fantastic in most areas, where I was able to use my 2G roaming and access my maps on my phone to get us back on track. If not, we could holler a cab or one of the million tuk-tuks. I was amazed at the quantity of tuk-tuks. Maybe because I didn’t know that any other country besides India uses them.

Overall I think Peru should make it on any backpackers list of countries to visit. I spent 3 weeks there and didn’t even hit the amazon. I never thought that I wanted to move on to the next country, that I was bored. Always more towns wiggling themselves on my list of places to see. I could have easily spent more time here, but other countries were calling my name. But no fret. I’ll be back one day.

Random facts I’ve encountered:

  • Insane amount of tuk-tuks
  • Excellent internet connection in most places
  • Tons of parks
  • Even more stray dogs
  • Awesome fresh grocery stands, but unfortunately also disgustingly unsanitary meat markets

Puno and Tacna

Puno (June 21 - 23, 2016)
Our commute to Puno was an adventure in itself. We could quickly tell that there was an issue with the engine, most likely with overheating. The bus constantly took breaks on the side of the road, until two hours in, where the bus stopped totally. The passengers waited for an hour, many stepping off the bus. I got startled when a woman, like an actress in a Spanish soap opera, dramatically started yelling in Spanish as if a life-threatening emergency was occurring. The backup bus arrived. Some commuters didn’t have an assigned seat since they boarded the bus later on the side of the street, and overfull, 2 people had to nest in the hallway. So now the passengers with assigned seats didn’t want their spots stolen by the others. I never saw a transfer that fast. After a minute, moving their belongings first, everybody had taken their spot on the second bus. Because of this fiasco, our 7-hour ride got extended to 9 hours. Every time the driver would stop at a station, passengers furiously yelled “let’s go” in hope to rush along the driver. I was glad others were annoyed, since I had concerns at arriving at my destination during the wee hours.

With us having researched hostel options prior, arriving at night didn’t end up posing an issue. The nice hostel felt more like a hotel. After a sturdy, complimentary breakfast, we were off to Lake Titicaca. The floating islands are the major attractions of Puno. For $1.30 we could have taken a boat over to an island, but caught up in the moment and unaware of this option, we ended up with a last-minute tour for $8.

 View from our boat ride to the floating islands

View from our boat ride to the floating islands

The tour offers background information on the history, native citizens (Uru), and construction method of the islands. Funny to learn how the Incas, a major empire, ignored conquering these islands because they were considered unimportant. The Incas collapsed, the Uru people are still alive today. The islands lack natural resources, obviously. The ground being totora reefs woven together makes the islands only useful for shelter. In addition to being building material, the reefs are utilized for food, apparently especially healthy for the teeth, keeping the choppers white and shiny. For Lake Titicaca, the “Titi belongs to Peru, and the “Caca” to Bolivia (joke by guide since the lake stretches in both countries.)

Today the locals rely heavily on tourism. Most people are naturally curious about other people’s homes, which makes viewing their humble dwellings from the inside enthralling. There is not much to see in the tiny huts, but as the owner explains their home, comparing them to other options is still entertaining.

 Standing on a floating island

Standing on a floating island

I enjoyed meeting the natives, but hated the constant peer pressure. During the tour, I felt guilty for not purchasing handcrafted goods, nor taking the special, reef boat ride. The entire time the guide would emphasize how much the locals rely on tourism to pay for schooling and medication. Trying to get tourists to pay for the local boat ride to the bigger island, the island president kept pressing on for us to go. Initially charging $3, the two of us ended up getting a half off deal ($1.50) and told to not tell anybody else. We declined. Multiple times. Constantly needing to explain why not. The bigger island is just a minute away, and we ended up going there anyways with the regular boat because we needed to pick up the other people. Glad we didn’t spend the extra money. If you go, they will first sing some songs in their language to you, and for some hilarious reason also the song “My Bonnie lies over the ocean.”

What I found the most fun about the island, was the strange feeling standing on the reefs. Has this bouncy, squishy quality to it. I think the island is worth going to, just hide your wallet and don’t succumb to the pressure if you don’t want the items.

 One of the floating islands

One of the floating islands

Other than Lake Titicaca, the Puno is a small, quiet town. The only additional advice I can give revolves around food. If you want to eat cheaply, ask for the local market. While eating at the market, I didn’t see one other foreigner. Standing out, lots of kids stared at me. A girl made a point to touch my arm while she walked past me, but this didn’t bother me. I ate up, and returned to the hostel to make preparations for departure the following day.

Cost breakdown of Puno in USD:

  • Hostel: $17.86 (2 nights)
  • Transportation: $6.49
  • Food: $7.89
  • Activity: $8.04 (Floating Islands)
  • Miscellaneous: $5.06 (laundry)

Daily Average Cost: $ 22.66


Tacna (June 23 - 24, 2016)
Tacna is a town at the border to Chile. We stayed here solely due to its location. From the regional bus terminal, we took a cab to the international terminal. The nearby restaurant options are at this terminal. 2 blocks away, a row of cheap hotels compete for your business. In the morning we caught a bus to the border crossing. Everything went smooth, until we got into Chile… Keep tuned for my first post about Chile, where one weird occurrence after the other happened on the same day.

Cost breakdown of Tacna in USD:

  • Hotel: $5.21 (1 night)
  • Transportation: $5.06
  • Food: $2.08

Daily Average Cost: $ 12.35

Cusco (June 18- 21, 2016)

Cusco has lots of drool-worthy sites for history buffs. Located on top of a hill, Saqsaywaman is walking distance. The entry fee of these ruins are outrageous. Somewhere around the $40 if I recall correctly. That doesn’t mean that a visit is out of the question. If you walk along the road all the way up to the main entry and go little further up, you can view lots of ruins from there without paying. Yes, you are not walking inside up close, but you can still see. On the way down the hill, I needed to retie my ponytail. I couldn’t have picked a worse spot. Over the side I saw a bag. Being my curious self, I felt the need to peer over to see what this big bag was. Dog food. But instead of food, I could see the head of a black dog that was no longer breathing. Did not anticipate that.

 Saqsaywaman from the street

Saqsaywaman from the street

Moving on from that visual… A historical museum and churches are popular sites around the city’s main plaza. I suggest to pop by an info desk to acquire a map, which will lay out your options. Something not to miss is the San Paolo market. Some vendors are selling souvenirs, but the other half is offering food. Cheap, delicious food. For $1.50 I got myself a filling plate. We went on a weekend evening for dinner and the market was intensely crowded. Luckily the morning is less popular, we didn’t have to battle for our seats for breakfast. But the food is worth fighting for. Not literally punching, but shoving myself on a bench between two strangers. I claim this space.

 Sao Paolo Market in the morning

Sao Paolo Market in the morning

Cusco is known for famous Machu Picchu. Machu Picchu is not in the city. Cusco, the Incan capital, is just the closest city by this world wonder. Be sure to buy an entry ticket in advance since the site only allows a set amount of visitors per day. We got ours 2 weeks prior, but locals called us crazy for waiting that long. Apparently people get these months before. Yay for traveling during low season.

There are various ways to get to these ruins. Some take time, effort, and/or money. The most time consuming is hiking the 4-day trail. The train requires the least amount of time, but costs the most. For $80 you’ll reach your destination in few hours. We chose to the bus option, which takes a day. From Cusco we rode a bus to Santa Maria ($4.50), then took a van to Santa Teresa ($3), and from there a cab escorted us to the trail start ($1.50). At the trail start we had to walk 2 hours along the train tracks to Agua Caliente, where we spent the night.

 Thick morning fog at Machu Picchu

Thick morning fog at Machu Picchu

At 5:45am we hiked up to Machu Picchu. You can take a bus for $12 one-way. The hike comprises mostly stairs and takes 1 hour. We made the mistake to not carry water with us. They sell bottles at the top, but for 4 times the price. The water was regularly priced, but they added a service charge and a tip automatically which ended up bumping the price from $0.60 to $2.40.

Any luggage item will be required to be stored. Walk through the entry first and store your belongings there, since the inside location has a lower charge by 60 cents. I left my backpack in Cusco with the hostel that charged the same amount. This helped because now we didn’t have to carry both baggage the entire walk. With all the walking we did (8 hours), our feet were hurting at the end.

Inside the actual ruins, the site is worth the exertion. My mind was blownl that a society would put in the effort to build a citadel on top of a mountain. Be mentally prepared for the hordes of selfie-taking humans. You’ll probably will turn into one yourself. Guides are readily available, but I chose to eavesdrop on a few of them while we walked by to pick up the information for free. I definitely didn’t get all the facts with this method, but that’s fine by me. My favorite fact was that the Incans would put dry wood in a crack of a rock, make the wood wet, and the expansion of the wood would break the rock. Smart.

 Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu

Hiking back down around 1pm, we weren’t going to stay another night in Agua Caliente. So we had to walk the 2 hours to the cab. The easy trail is flat along a train tracks, but the terrain is uncomfortably rocky. The biggest problem arose in Santa Maria. The bus wasn’t leaving until late night and the van costs more, but won’t leave until a minimum of 7 passengers. A Brazilian guy came shortly after us, but the other 4 backpackers didn’t show until an hour later. At least we got some quality bonding time with the Brazilian guy.

We ended up arriving in Cusco at 11pm. Probably not the safest drop off area, we rushed our way to our old hostel. Only a few people were on the streets and stores were closed. Our hostel had shut its doors also. Little in panic, we rang the doorbell, praying the staff would let us in. On the 3rd ring, I heard motion inside. A guy let us in and got us into a bed room. With everything closed, I wouldn’t have known where to go, even less which place offers room and board. Lesson learned. If I’m arriving past 10pm, I need to make a hostel booking in advance or know of hostels which offer 24-hour reception.

Overall, we could have spent more time in Cusco exploring all the historical spots, but we wanted to keep on a schedule (booked a flight). If you are archeologically inclined, I would suggest give the old capital extra time. Next time I go, you can find me spending all my time in Sao Paolo Market.

Cost breakdown of Cusco in USD*:

  • Hostel: $56.55
  • Transportation: $49.55
  • Food: $22
  • Activity: $38 (Machu Picchu)
  • Miscellaneous: $1.20 storage fee

Daily Average Cost: $46.37

Ica and Nazca

Ica (June 14-16, 2016)
A small dot on a map, this town doesn’t offer much, but what they offer is fun: sand buggies and sandboarding. Sand dunes stretch further than the eye can see. We arrived here at 3pm. Down $16, we were already sitting in a sand buggy at 4pm. Attempting a rollercoaster effect, the driver swerves around the sand dunes hoping for screams of terror. The Hispanic women couldn’t help but screech. I must admit, I ended up letting out a shout myself. I recommend wearing a bandana around your mouth if you don’t want to swallow sand during the ride, and big sunglasses to protect your eyes. And use your common sense. Please don’t wear a dress/skirt. (White clothing will stain brown from the sand.) Two German girls wore short dresses to their discomfort, since part of this trip includes sandboarding.

 Sand Buggy

Sand Buggy

If my memory serves me right, sandboarding is slightly more difficult than snowboarding. Heeding to the guide’s warning, I chose to sled down the first hill instead. Afterwards, I trekked back up the hill and sandboarded the second time. I fell almost instantly. Was more of a tumble down the hill. If I was a cartoon, I would have become and epic sandball. The second hill I sandboarded again. This time more successfully. I was almost all the way down, but then fell hard with the momentum I had going. I wish I had a recording of me falling for your entertainment.

I do however, have a film of me sledding down the last hill. To the concern of my driver, I requested “rapido” (fast). He owned wax, which he would smear at the bottom of the board for speed. The other females in the group used their feet to slow down. For a female to request speed must have been very unusual for him, because he ended up asking my life story as he was prepping the board. The fastest in the group, a guy at the bottom moved out of my way because I sledded further. In expense of a sandburn on my left arm, I desperately leaned to the side to avoid hitting him. Happy I went. Definitely put this activity on your bucket list.

Cost breakdown of Ica in USD*:

  • Hostel: $10.12
  • Transportation: $11.46
  • Food: $6.08
  • Activity: $16.07 (Nazca Lines)

Daily Average Cost: $21.87


Nazca (June 16-18, 2016)
Nazca is only a hop away from Ica. The world famous Nazca lines are here. Some claim that aliens have ventured here and made these lines (Alien Invasion!!!), but I think that humans were smart enough to create these giant drawings in the desert sand. Because this area gets less than an inch of rain and only mild wind each year, the awe-inspiring lines have remained for all these centuries. The lines are shallow. Imagine solemnly brushing away the bigger pebbles on top and that’s basically how the lines are made.

 A straight line that stretches all the way to the mountain in the back

A straight line that stretches all the way to the mountain in the back

There are various methods to see the lines:
• Flying ($68 - $108)
• Ground Tour ($21 - $60)
• Solo ($3)

Flying is the most expensive method. According to an agency, $100 is normal for high season. We were visiting during low season and talked an offer down to $60. Keep in mind that the airport charges a $8 tax that’s not included in the price. During the 30min flight you will fly over all Nazca lines and view all of them from above. English pilot/guide usually on board.

We chose the ground tour option. Seems like these tours are set up by the hostels with connections they have. There are ruins 2-hour drive away from town and some tours will include this attraction, but at a higher cost (~ $60). Our trip had 3 stops for $20. First to a hill where a line was touchable-close. Second to a viewing-tower ($1) where we could see 2 actual drawings. Third stop was more ancient drawings than Nazca lines. We choose this option because we wanted to hear the history and ask questions.
A method to make your ground tour cheaper: If you sabotage the car and have to wait for hours to return, then you can haggle with your guide. I’m just kidding. Don’t destroy a vehicle. A girl from our hostel ran into this issue and with much effort talked down the price from $60 to $20.

Solo is super cheap. A one-way bus ride costs $1 and then $1 for the observation tower (called Mirador). There won’t be a guide at the tower to explain the history to you. In the town of Nazca, there is an information stand that can direct you to the bus stop if you’re interested.

 Picture from the internet showing the tree line and the Mirador (observation tower)

Picture from the internet showing the tree line and the Mirador (observation tower)

I still can’t get over the shallowness of the lines and that I could still see them from super far away. If you are in the region, definitely stop by this place to take a look. You’ll be amazed.

Cost breakdown of Nazca in USD*:

  • Hostel: $7 (incl. breakfast)
  • Transportation: $2.98 (initial transportation to the city)
  • Food: $9.82
  • Activity: $18.75 (Nazca Lines)

Daily Average Cost: $18.30

Huaraz (June 8-10) and Lima (June 10-14, 2016)

Huaraz
Huaraz, the center of the universe. At least that’s what the society of the Chavin temple thought of themselves back in the day. Why? Because of the mountains being shaped as 3 of their gods. As the Spanish tour guide explained this, I really couldn’t envision the animal shapes in the mountain range. Others were nodding in agreement though. Do I need to correct the prescription on my glasses, or is this a story like the naked king?

Anyways, the Chavin temple has impressive architecture as the city attempted earthquake safe construction, for example sloping their walls by 5 degrees. Big place, rare signage. I believe there are English tour guides available, but 2 ladies in our group had to wait too long and gave up. Might be worth exploring this more before departure if English guide is important to you. Expect to drive 2 hours with a stop at a serene lake on the way. The city, like many, have a set price for this tour. Our hostel arranged ours at a good price. We looked into bussing up ourselves, but going solo costs more for some reason. Would be smart to pack a lunch.

 Chavin Temple

Chavin Temple

Upon our return from the ruins, we caught the end of a parade. Not sure why or what Huaraz was celebrating, but we could see different types of cultural ware as we cut through the crowd. We managed to pick the slowest “fast food” place in the world. The 2-man staff seemed lost; and getting change required more time than receiving and eating the Peruvian burger. The city itself has much potential, unfortunately littering is an obvious issue. Other than that, it is surrounded by mountains, has a river through the town, and parks with artistic statues. I hope they get a cleanup crew through, and this town might be up there in the picturesque towns list.

Cost breakdown of Huaraz in USD*:

  • Hostel: $11.90 (incl. breakfast)
  • Transportation: $11.90 (initial transportation to the city)
  • Food: $6.11
  • Activity: $21.66 (Chavin Temple)

Daily Average Cost: $16.89


Lima
Right off the bat we noticed the heavy traffic. Imagine your city’s rush hour, times the traffic by 3, and then expand the time from 5am to midnight. You might get a break on the weekend though. My family member was driving us around to show us Lima around 11pm, and traffic still wasn’t pretty.

Don’t let traffic stop you from visiting! Lima, the capital, has much to offer. We stayed at my humorous extended family’s home in Miraflores, the tourist district. 3 blocks away, the Pucllana temple ruins portrays Lima’s history during the day and apparently becomes a trendy, expensive bar at night. Our guide suggested to try lucuma (a fruit) ice cream. I recommend this too!! I wanted to refuse sharing my ice cream, that tasted a toffee and fruit flavor combined. My description doesn’t do justice, just try it!

The district uses Mirabus (translated looking-bus) to give tours of the city. As we got one from my family, we didn’t use this service. For more information, stop by the info stand by the Kennedy park. This park should be renamed “cat park” because there are at least 100 stray, well-fed, groomed cats roaming around. Perfect destressing spot. Gotta catch ’em all.

 Parque de la Reserva

Parque de la Reserva

Another, not-to miss-park, should be the “Parque de la Reserva.” Alternate local name, Parque Agua (Water Park). For a mere $1.30, visit the various fountains with lights. Because of the lights, I would recommend night time or the effect would be wasted. There is a tunnel connecting the two park sections. We almost would have walked around the outside, if the exiting personnel didn’t advise us; no reentry allowed, so we would have had to pay again. Some fountains are interactive, the most popular one displays a light show with orchestra music.

Nearby this place, there is an art park, “Parque de Exposicion”. The art museum there was recommended by my family, but we forgot to enter because a street fair of some sorts was taking place. Lots of hustle and bustle. Skateboarders, graffiti artists, and street dancers galore. Music blaring everywhere as we moseyed through. Being a dancer myself, I heavily needed to repress my dancing urge to not become the random white girl demonstrating the sprinkler. Nah, I know other genres, but I can bust out the white moves like a pro.

Before this place, we visited the Larco museum. Must be one of the largest, private collections of pottery, displaying over 45,000 pieces. Past the main entry, don’t go through the left door first! The sheer volume of pottery displayed is overwhelming and frustrating. After the first room, I didn’t know what to look at anymore. Less is more. Heading straight is the best option. The museum is laid out by region and then year. If you don’t want to stop by lots of history museums in South America, this one might be the best because at one spot you can observe items from many civilizations of various timelines. Potentially losing some historic details of each cultural story though. There is even an erotic pottery section.

 Lima waterfront with heavy fog in the background

Lima waterfront with heavy fog in the background

Oh, and I can’t forget the vast waterfront area. Beautiful landscape, spanning a full day’s walk. Don’t expect to view to far out into the ocean, because of the heavy fog. Lima is known for its crazy fog. There are so many beautiful public parks all over Peru that I’m jealous. Not far from the “Maria Reiche” (discoverer and protector of the Nazca lines) section of the waterfront, there is the La Mar. If you feel fancy and don’t mind spending a little more ($10 - $25), make a reservation for this restaurant. The creator is the renowned chef Gastón Acurio, who is the Peru’s best known celebrity chef. Thank you Oscar (my family member) for introducing us to this mouthwatering deliciousness! So far Lima was my favorite place in Peru. Probably because of the diverse options. Don’t worry Oscar, I’m sure I will take you up on your offer to crash at your place again. :)

 My fancy food at La Mar

My fancy food at La Mar

Cost breakdown of Lima in USD*:
• Transportation: $13.84
• Food: $22.74
• Activity: $13.69

Daily Average Cost: $12.57

Mancora (June 3-6) and Trujillo (June 6-8, 2016)

Mancora

 Sunset at Mancora

Sunset at Mancora

The objective of Mancora was to have a spot in between Cuenca and Trujillo to split the long drive. This small town feels like Baños, Ecuador. A lot of activities are offered, but instead of mountainous/height-required sports, they offer water attractions. We picked Mancora because there should have been the perfect opportunity for my first surf lesson. I say should, because essentially there were no waves. So I didn’t surf. Sad face. Another time then. Even with the bad timing, we still enjoyed our leisurely stroll on the long beach and watched the sunset.

I can’t forget the mention that I almost cried here! I LOVE the food so much in comparison to Ecuador. Yes, I’m eating cheap, but the cheap food in Peru holds more flavor. For S.8 (soles or $2.4 USD) the restaurant served a side of juicy ceviche, scrumptious ‘chicharron de pescado’ (deep-fried pieces of fish), crunchy fries, and juice. This gets me excited for the rest of Peru. Please serve savory food the entire time. Don’t let me down.

 Chicharron de pescado (and eaten ceviche on the left)

Chicharron de pescado (and eaten ceviche on the left)

Cost breakdown of Mancora in USD*:
• Housing: $14.88 (2 hostel nights which included breakfast)
• Transportation: $21.6 (initial transportation to the city)
• Food: $16.82

Daily Average Cost: $17.77


Trujillo
In Trujillo we got welcomed into my extended family’s beautiful home. The Lama family were amazing hosts, who made us feel welcome, helped us get around the city, and fed us. My wallet smiled at the free bed, but my favorite parts were looking over their shoulders as they cooked to steal their recipes and conversing with them in Spanish.

Their English is limited, so we mixed in our broken Spanish and I got to improve my language skills. We got to hear more about the Peruvian culture and compared notes between countries. The most baffling story we heard was a police car got stolen while the cop was voting in the governmental building! That wouldn’t end to well in the USA. Maybe this is one of the reason for the high volume of police force here.

Moving on to sightseeing…. At the outskirts of Trujillo, Chan Chan (sun sun) spanned 20 km2. With only a portion left, the ruins entail a fascinating story. The historical site contains a lack of signs, so If you aren’t an archeological genius, I would recommend a guide. Our guide spoke decent English, possessed a vast knowledge, and often replayed some key sentences like a broken audiobook. My favorite fact was the huge fresh water pond the Chimu’s had hidden at the center, which probably was the main reason why the Incas took such a long time to conquer them. From the main site we made our way to the Chan Chan museum, which unfortunately was closed for the next few days for some reason.

If you only have time for one site in Trujillo, over big Chan Chan, I would pick the colorful temple of the sun and the moon (huaca del sol y de la luna). This temple is considerably smaller than Chan Chan, but the restoration is better with many colorful murals. As I walked through the temple of the moon, the entry-fee-included guide spoke about the constant remodeling the society did every 50 years or so, to make the building bigger and more impressive. One could literally observe the increase due to the various layers the archeologists, and unfortunately the grave robbers/Spaniards have exposed. The colors/carvings on the walls are vivid and with a few explanations play an easy to follow story. Due to need of funding for archeologists, the temple of the sun is not open to the public.

 Temple of the sun and the moon

Temple of the sun and the moon

Expect to do lots of walking in Trujillo. Compared to other towns we’ve visited, this city is vast. Oftentimes our hosts would drop us off at our point of interest, but from there we had to find our own way back. And we did it all. Walking for hours, riding a mini bus, or waving down a cab during times of weakness. Because of the temple of the sun and the moon, I would recommend you stop by this city and take on the commute challenge.

Cost breakdown of Mancora in USD*:
• Transportation: $16.52 (initial transportation to the city)
• Food: $5.95
• Activity: $11.31 (historical sites)

Daily Average Cost: $16.89